Deadly wheat blast in Bangladesh worries scientists as authorities battle to contain its spread – report

Farmers in Bangladesh are struggling to contain Asia’s first outbreak of a fungal disease that periodically devastates crops in South America, as plant pathologists warn that wheat blast could spread to other parts of south and southeast Asia, an article in the Nature magazine said.

Wheat blast is caused by the fungus Magnaporthe oryzae. Since 1985, when scientists discovered it in Brazil’s Paraná state, the disease has raced across South America.

First detected in February in Bangladesh and confirmed with genome sequencing this month, the wheat-blast outbreak has already caused the loss of more than 15,000 hectares of crops in that country.

“It’s really an explosive, devastating disease,” says plant pathologist Barbara Valent of Kansas State University in Manhattan, Kansas. “It’s really critical that it be controlled in Bangladesh,” she was quoted as saying the article.

Sophien Kamoun, a biologist at the Sainsbury Laboratory in Norwich, UK, who has created a website, Open Wheat Blast (go.nature.com/bkczwf), to encourage researchers to share data, said it was important to know what the strain is.

After rice, wheat is the second most cultivated grain in Bangladesh, which has a population of 156 million people. More broadly, inhabitants of south Asia grow 135 million tonnes of wheat each year.

“There are regions in South America where they don’t grow wheat because of the disease,” Valent said. Wheat blast was spotted in Kentucky in 2011, but vigorous surveillance helped to stop it spreading in the United States, the article said.

In South America, the disease tends to take hold in hot and humid spells. Such conditions are present in Bangladesh, and the disease could migrate across south and southeast Asia, say plant pathologists. In particular, it could spread over the Indo-Gangetic Plain through Bangladesh, northern India and eastern Pakistan, warn scientists at the Bangladesh Agricultural Research Institute (BARI) in Nashipur.

The magazine said Bangladeshi officials are burning government-owned wheat fields to contain the fungus, and telling farmers not to sow seeds from infected plots. The BARI hopes to identify wheat varieties that are more tolerant of the fungus and agricultural practices that can keep it at bay, such as crop rotation and seed treatment.

It is unknown how wheat blast got to Bangladesh. One possibility is that a wheat-infecting strain was brought in from South America, says Nick Talbot, a plant pathologist at the University of Exeter, UK. Another is that an M. oryzae strain that infects south Asian grasses somehow jumped to wheat, perhaps triggered by an environmental shift: that is what happened in Kentucky, when a rye-grass strain

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